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Dr. James Toney book :Lithium Niobate Photonics" is available for preorder

SRICO Inc. to attend CLEO Exhibition 2015 - Booth 1918

San Jose, CA
May 12-14, 2015

SRICO Inc. to attend OFC Exhibition 2015 - Booth 2229

Los Angeles, CA
March 24, 2015

SRICO Inc. to attend Photonics West Exhibition 2015 - Booth 4330

San Francisco, CA
February 10, 2015

NEW PRODUCT ANNOUNCEMENT
SRICO introduces Periodically Poled Lithium Niobate (PPLN) waveguide device for fiber-based frequency combs and spectroscopy

Dr. Jim Toney to attend and present at Comsol 2014

Boston, MA
October 9, 2014

According to the Army SBIR website for ARMY FY2014.1 Phase I SBIR SELECTIONS, https://www.armysbir.army.mil/awards/sbir_phase_I_recent.aspx SRICO’s proposal entitled “Quantum Frequency Conversion for Quantum Communication” (Topic No. A14-021) has been selected for Phase I negotiation.

April 24, 2014

SRICO Inc. to attend OFC Exhibition 2014 - Booth 3484

San Francisco, CA
March 11 - March 13, 2014

SRICO Inc. to attend Photonics West Exhibition 2014 - Booth 4732

San Francisco, CA
February 4 - February 6, 2014

IMR and Nanotech West Awarded $2.54 Million to Form Ohio Sensor and Semiconductor Innovation Platform (OSSIP) SRICO Inc. to be industry partner

SRICO Inc. PPLN waveguides used in Development of a Photon Pair Source Using Periodically Poled Lithium Niobate (PPLN) and Fiber Optic Components presented by Dr. Lee Oesterling at SPW 2013

According the Army SBIR/STTR website for Army FY2013 STTR PHASE II SELECTIONS, https://www.armysbir.army.mil/awards/company/sttr_phase2_recent.aspx
SRICO’s proposal entitled “Narrowband Perfect Absorber for Infrared Sensing (Topic No. A12a-T023) has been selected for Phase II negotiation.

September 12, 2013

SRICO Inc. to attend AMTA 2013

Columbus, Ohio
October 6 - October 11, 2013

Dr. Jim Toney to present at AMTA 2013:
Surface Electromagnetic Wave Characterization Using Non-invasive Photonic Electric Field Sensors

SRICO Inc. to attend CLEO 2013 Exhibition - Booth 2025

San Jose, California
June 11 - June 13, 2013

Dr. Sri Sriram to present at CLEO 2013:
Engineered Thin Film Lithium Niobate Substrate for High Gain-Bandwidth Electro-optic Modulators

San Jose, California
June 12, 2013

SRICO Inc. to attend SPIE Defense, Security, and Sensing 2013 Exhibition - Booth 1836

Baltimore, Maryland
April 30 - May 2, 2013

SRICO Inc. to attend OFC/NFOEC 2013 Exhibition - Booth 2556 (Hall B)

Anaheim, California
March 19-21, 2013

SRICO Inc. to attend SPIE Photonics West Exhibition - Booth 4732

San Francisco, California
February 5-7, 2013

Dr. Vince Stenger to present at SPIE OPTO Photonics West:
Quasi-phase-matched electro-optic modulators for high-speed signal processing

San Francisco, California
February 6, 2013

Dr. Vince Stenger to present at SPIE OPTO Photonics West:
Integrated RF photonic devices based on crystal ion sliced lithium niobate

San Francisco, California
February 6, 2013

Dr. Vince Stenger to present at SPIE OPTO Photonics West:
Crystal ion sliced lithium niobate for efficient 100 GHz electro-optic modulation

San Francisco, California
February 5, 2013

Dr. Vince Stenger to present at Avionics, Fiber-Optics and Photonics Conference (AVFOP 2012):
Electro-optic Devices in Thin Film Lithium Niobate (TFLN™)

Cocoa Beach, Florida
September 11-13, 2012

Dr. Sri Sriram to present at ECOC 2012 Conference:
Wide-Band Electro-Optic Modulator in Thin-Film Lithium Niobate on Quartz Substrate

Amsterdam
September 16-20, 2012

SRICO TFLN™ used in novel micro-resonators presented at International Microwave Symposium 2012

Montréal, Canada
June 20th, 2012

Dr. James Toney to present at SPIE Nanophotonics and Macrophotonics for Space Environments 2012; Advanced materials and device technology for photonic electric field sensors

San Diego, California
August 13th, 2012

Dr. James Toney to present at SPIE Photonic Fiber and Crystal Devices 2012; Low-voltage, high-speed electro-optic scanner and switch in crystal-ion-sliced thin-film lithium niobate

San Diego, California
August 12th, 2012

Dr. James Toney presents at The Defense and Security Symposium 2012; Photonic Crystal Electro-optic Devices in Engineered Thin Film Lithium Niobate Substrates

Baltimore, Maryland
April 27th, 2012

Dr. Vince Stenger presents at SPIE Photonics West Terahertz Technology and Applications Conference; Thin Film Lithium Tantalate (TFLT™) pyroelectric detectors

San Francisco, California
January 26th, 2012

Dr. Vince Stenger gives invited talk at Materials Research Society Spring 2009 Conference; Room Temperature Pyroelectric Terahertz Radiation Detectors Formed by Crystal Ion Slicing of Lithium Tantalate

San Francisco, California
April 15th, 2009

Spectrum Detector, Inc. And Strategic Partner, SRICO, Inc., Win Phase I SBIR Air Force Contract

Lake Oswego, Oregon
March 16, 2008

SRICO Develops Economical New Processing Technique for Nonlinear Optical Components

Columbus, OH
October 17, 2006

SRICO Develops New Materials Platform for Optical Components

Columbus, OH
October 16, 2006

SRICO WINS CONTRACT TO DEVELOP ULTRA-HIGH DYNAMIC RANGE OPTICAL MODULATORS

Columbus, OH
August 29, 2005

SRICO TO DEVELOP OPTICAL EEG SENSOR SYSTEM TO MONITOR GRAVITY-INDUCED LOSS OF CONSCIOUSNESS (GLOC) IN MILITARY PILOTS

Columbus, OH
July 11, 2005

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Dr. Jim Toney to present at AMTA 2013

Surface Electromagnetic Wave Characterization Using Non-invasive Photonic Electric Field Sensors

Electromagnetic properties of aircraft and missile skins have a large effect on radar cross sections and determine the level of stealth that is achieved over the various RF bands currently in use. RF absorption, reflection, and propagation along the skin surface all serve as important measures of the electromagnetic performance of the coated surfaces. Non-invasive probing of the electromagnetic field just above the propagating wave at multiple spots along the propagation direction can be used to determine and measure wave propagation parameters, including effective RF index, loss per length, wave impedance, and frequency band, material properties of the coatings.Wide-band photonic electric field sensors have been demonstrated for probing of dielectric layers by measuring the traveling waves along the coated aircraft surface. The photonic E-field sensors are extremely linear and produce an exact real time analog RF representation of the electric field, including phase information. These UWB photonic RF sensors are very small and contain negligible metal content. Such properties allow them to be placed directly on the surface at close proximity without perturbing surface waves. This is very important in accurately characterizing highly damped surface waves on absorber layers. This paper discusses the linearity, bandwidth, polarization, and sensitivity of the unique UWB photonic E-field sensor design. We will also demonstrate surface-wave characterization measurement using these sensors.


Dr. Sri Sriram to present at CLEO 2013

Engineered Thin Film Lithium Niobate Substrate for High Gain-Bandwidth Electro-optic Modulators

This paper reports the demonstration of a high-speed electro-optic modulator in crystal ion sliced thin film lithium niobate (TFLN™). Experimental results indicate potential to realize a 100 GHz TFLN™ modulator at 1550 nm with V= 2.5V.

Thin Film Lithium Niobate (TFLN™) is produced by SRICO, Inc. 2724 Sawabury Blvd., Columbus, OH 43235, USA.


Dr. Vince Stenger to present at SPIE OPTO Photonics West

Quasi-phase-matched electro-optic modulators for high-speed signal processing

This paper reports on the design, fabrication and testing of quasi-phase-matched (QPM) lithium niobate electro-optic modulators optimized for the 40-60 GHz frequency range. The device used a single-drive, coplanar-waveguide (cpw) electrode structure that provided a good balance between impedance and RF loss, and a DC Vpi.L product of approximately 10 V.cm. Ferroelectric domain engineering enabled push-pull operation with a single drive, while achieving low chirp. Arrays of the QPM devices serve as the basis for a reconfigurable wideband photonic RF signal processor.


Dr. Vince Stenger to present at SPIE OPTO Photonics West

Integrated RF photonic devices based on crystal ion sliced lithium niobate

Thin film lithium niobate (TFLN™) is formed on various substrates using a layer transfer process called crystal ion slicing. Unlike physical deposition processes, the transferred film is bulk quality, retaining all the favorable properties of the bulk seed crystal. Ion slicing opens up a vast design space and enable lithium niobate electro-optic devices that were previously not possible. Experimental results for a number of TFLN™ device structures are reviewed. The structures include velocity matched electro-optic modulators for broadband fiber link applications, narrowband quasi-phase matched modulators for RF filtering and signal processing, and beam steering devices for optical switch functions.


Dr. Vince Stenger to present at SPIE OPTO Photonics West

Crystal ion sliced lithium niobate for efficient 100 GHz electro-optic modulation

Thin film lithium niobate (TFLN™) is formed on various substrates using a layer transfer process called crystal ion slicing. Unlike physical deposition processes, the transferred film is bulk quality, retaining all the favorable properties of the bulk seed crystal. Ion slicing opens up a vast design space and enable high frequency lithium niobate electro-optic devices that were previously not possible. Theoretical and experimental results for a number of TFLN™ modulator devices are reviewed. The device structures include velocity matched electro-optic modulators for broadband fiber link applications and photonic crystal based modulators for ultra-compact electric field (E-field) sensor applications.


Dr. Vince Stenger to present at Avionics, Fiber-Optics and Photonics Conference (AVFOP 2012)

Electro-optic Devices in Thin Film Lithium Niobate (TFLN™)

Recent R&D projects have placed SRICO at the forefront of Thin Film Lithium Niobate (TFLN™) technology to create advanced photonic, electro-optic devices and nonlinear optical devices. This talk will address the method of producing TFLN™ and results of novel devices fabricated using thin film lithium niobate. Key avionics and defense applications include phased array radar, free space optical communications, mobile communications, satellite communications, antenna remoting, wideband electronic warfare receivers, optical time delay modules, and surveillance activities.


Dr. Sri Sriram to present at ECOC 2012 Conference

Wide-Band Electro-Optic Modulator in Thin-Film Lithium Niobate on Quartz Substrate

This paper reports the first demonstration of a high-speed electro-optic modulator in crystal ion sliced thin film lithium niobate (TFLN™). The device exhibits a VπL of 4.75 V*cm, 8dB RF loss at 65 GHz and 40 GHz electro-optic bandwidth.

Thin Film Lithium Niobate (TFLN™) is produced by SRICO, Inc. 2724 Sawabury Blvd., Columbus, OH 43235, USA.


SRICO TFLN(™) used in novel micro-resonators presented at International Microwave Symposium 2012

High Electromechanical Coupling MEMS Resonators at 530MHz using Ion Sliced X-cut LiNbO3 Thin Film

Prof. Gianluca Piazza’s group (Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA) reports on a new type of micro-resonators enabled by micromachining of ion sliced X-cut LiNbO3 thin films. The demonstrated devices have shown a high electromechanical coupling of 8.23%, the highest attained for laterally vibrating MEMS resonators.

Thin Film Lithium Niobate (TFLN™) is produced by SRICO, Inc. 2724 Sawabury Blvd., Columbus, OH 43235, USA.


Dr. James Toney to present at SPIE Nanophotonics and Macrophotonics for Space Environments 2012

Advanced materials and device technology for photonic electric field sensors

This paper will discuss several new directions in photonic electric field sensing technology for defense applications. The first is the use of crystal ion slicing to prepare high-quality, single-crystal electro-optic thin films on low-dielectric-constant, RF-friendly substrates. The second is the use of one- and two-dimensional photonic crystal structures to enhance the electro-optic response through slow-light propagation effects. The third is the use of ferroelectric relaxor materials with extremely high electro-optic coefficients. Results of Co-60 gamma-ray irradiation for energies > 1.0 MeV on selected devices will be presented to estimate the radiation hardness for potential space applications.


Dr. James Toney to present at SPIE Photonic Fiber and Crystal Devices 2012

Low-voltage, high-speed electro-optic scanner and switch in crystal-ion-sliced thin-film lithium niobate

Pyroelectric thermal detectors are excellent candidates for detection of broadband radiation. Such detectors utilize permanently poled ferroelectric single crystal lithium tantalate to generate a charge as the crystal heats up by absorbing radiation. In this paper, we report on the formation of thin film lithium tantalate (TFLT™) pyroelectric detector devices using a crystal ion slicing process. The devices incorporate films less than 9 microns thin and feature apertures as large as 5 mm in diameter. Test results have shown improvement in room temperature detectivity about 20 times higher than the state-of-the-art lithium tantalate pyroelectric detectors.


Dr. James Toney presents at The Defense and Security Symposium 2012

Photonic Crystal Electro-optic Devices in Engineered Thin Film Lithium Niobate Substrates

We report on photonic crystal electro-optic devices formed in engineered thin film lithium niobate (TFLN™) substrates. Photonic crystal devices previously formed in bulk diffused lithium niobate waveguides have been limited in performance by the depth and aspect ratio of the photonic crystal features. We have overcome this limitation by implementing enhanced etching processes in combination with bulk thin film layer transfer techniques. Photonic crystal lattices have been formed that consist of hexagonal or square arrays of holes. Various device configurations have been explored, including Fabry Perot resonators with integrated photonic crystal mirrors and coupled resonator structures. Both theoretical and experimental efforts have shown that device optical performance hinges on the fidelity and sidewall profiles of the etched photonic crystal lattice features. With this technology, very compact photonic crystal sensors on the order of 10 μm x 10 μm in size have been fabricated that have comparable performance to a conventional 2 cm long bulk substrate device. The photonic crystal device technology will have broad application as a compact and minimally invasive probe for sensing any of a multitude of physical parameters, including electrical, radiation, thermal and chemical.


Dr. Vince Stenger presents at SPIE Photonics West Terahertz Technology and Applications Conference; Thin Film Lithium Tantalate (TFLT™) pyroelectric detectors

Pyroelectric thermal detectors are excellent candidates for detection of broadband radiation. Such detectors utilize permanently poled ferroelectric single crystal lithium tantalate to generate a charge as the crystal heats up by absorbing radiation. In this paper, we report on the formation of thin film lithium tantalate (TFLT™) pyroelectric detector devices using a crystal ion slicing process. The devices incorporate films less than 9 microns thin and feature apertures as large as 5 mm in diameter. Test results have shown improvement in room temperature detectivity about 20 times higher than the state-of-the-art lithium tantalate pyroelectric detectors.


Dr. Vince Stenger gives invited talk at Materials Research Society Spring 2009 Conference; Room Temperature Pyroelectric Terahertz Radiation Detectors Formed by Crystal Ion Slicing of Lithium Tantalate

Pyroelectric thermal detectors are excellent candidates for broadband Terahertz (THz) radiation detection. Such detectors utilize permanently poled ferroelectric crystals to generate a charge as the crystal heats up by absorbing THz radiation. The charge is directly proportional to the rate of change of temperature of the crystal. The fundamental approach toward enhancing pyroelectric detector response is to form the pyroelectric material into a thin film. The reduction in thickness translates immediately to a proportionate increase in responsivity of the detector. The thermal time response is also faster by virtue of reduced thermal sinking through the thin film to the surrounding support structure. In general, both the thinness and the aspect ratio of detector aperture to film thickness will determine the aggregate performance gain achieved over a comparable sized thicker film detector. High aspect ratio detectors have additional benefit for arrays, where thermal isolation between pixels is especially important. To form thin uniform bulk quality films of pyroelectric lithium tantalate, SRICO uses crystal ion slicing techniques. In the slicing process, a bulk lithium tantalate seed wafer is implanted with helium ions to form a concentrated damage layer at a well defined and uniform depth below the wafer surface. Depending on the device application, ion slicing comprises either wet etch lift-off or thermal shearing off of the bulk crystal surface layer at the implant depth. After bonding to a suitable handle wafer, a polishing process is used to further thin and smooth the film. An important consideration for such thin films is the reduced available absorption depth as the film thickness is reduced. The radiation response for the detectors in this work was maximized by using absorbing spray-on carbon nanotube coatings with low thermal mass that rapidly transferred heat to the lithium tantalate crystal film. Detector devices based on 9 micron thick ion sliced films were demonstrated to have detectivity performance about 20 times that of state of the art commercially available products. More recent work has resulted in films on order of one to two micron thickness, over an order of magnitude thinner than films formed from mechanical lapping and polishing. Completed detector devices using such films are expected to achieve room temperature performance gains up to 100 times relative to state of the art commercially available pyroelectric detectors. The ion slicing and layer transfer process is scalable to wafer level processing on silicon substrates, making the technology suitable for monolithic THz imaging arrays and integrated electronics.

Feel free to download and review Vince's presentation here


Spectrum Detector, Inc. And Strategic Partner, SRICO, Inc., Win Phase I SBIR Air Force Contract

Lake Oswego, Oregon, March 16, 2008 – Spectrum Detector, Inc., a leading manufacturer of pyroelectric detectors, electronics and instruments for measuring optical power and energy, today announced its strategic partner, SRICO, Inc., a premier manufacturer of high performance optical integrated circuit components and optoelectronic subsystems, was awarded a Phase I SBIR contract from the United States Air Force Research Laboratory. This $100,000 contract enables Spectrum Detector and SRICO to work together to develop next-generation, ultra-sensitive pyroelectric detectors targeted at THz applications.

“We are developing a revolutionary process that will enable large-scale production of 1µm to 5µm, single-crystal, thin-film pyroelectric detectors,” said Sri Sriram, president of SRICO. “We anticipate an order of magnitude increase in detector performance over the current technology,” In addition, these devices will operate at room temperature, a major improvement over conventional high-sensitivity sensor solutions, like microbolometers, that typically require bulky, costly cryogenic cooling systems. “Room-temperature operation is critical,” Sriram continued. “Not only does it provide greater design flexibility, it helps open the door to a full range of portable THz applications, from medical instrumentation to bomb-detection devices.”

Spectrum Detector will focus its efforts on manufacturability. “What we bring to the table is the know-how to make these devices cost effective and easy to produce – while maintaining the utmost in quality and performance,” said Don Dooley, president of Spectrum Detector. “In today’s market, the most advanced thin-film detectors one can specify are typically 25µm thick– and these have to be hand crafted, one by one. In contrast, we anticipate our new manufacturing processes will allow semi-automated fabrication of up to 100 devices per substrate – even when fabricating devices as thin as 1µm to 5µm.”

About Spectrum Detector.
Spectrum Detector, Inc., is a leading manufacturer of standard and custom detectors, electronics and instruments for measuring optical power and energy. The company offers a wide range of advanced solutions including LiTaO3 pyroelectric detectors, broadband pyroelectric radiometers, silicon and germanium radiometers, pyroelectric and silicon joulemeters, optical and thermal TRAP detectors and THz detectors and instruments. The company also excels at customer service, providing custom engineered detectors and instruments, turnkey optical test sets, NIST traceable calibration in watts and joules and responsive technical support. For more information, contact Spectrum Detector, Inc., 5825 Jean Road Center, Lake Oswego, OR 97035, dond@spectrumdetector.com, (503) 697-1870. Web: www.spectrumdetector.com

About SRICO
SRICO specializes in the design, development, manufacture, and worldwide marketing of high performance optical integrated circuit components and optoelectronic subsystems that dramatically improve optical signal transmission and electrical measurement in communication and sensor networks. Among the company’s current product portfolio are photonic sensors that detect and measure electric field, current, and voltage; electro-optic modulators; optical wavelength switches; optical frequency converters; and analog fiber optic links. For more information, contact SRICO, Inc., 2724 Sawbury Blvd., Columbus, OH 43235-4579, sri@srico.com, (614) 799 0664. Web: www.srico.com


SRICO Develops New Materials Platform for Optical Components

Columbus, OH – SRICO, Inc., a manufacturer of state-of-the-art optoelectronic components, has successfully developed innovative methods to produce periodically oriented compound semiconductor nonlinear optical materials. The new processing techniques will provide an economical means of manufacturing high quality semiconductor and other crystals that serve as a platform for optical components used in military and civilian communication and sensor networks. Nonlinear optical materials are presently used in telecommunications as switches and modulators and impact broadband communication technologies such as dense-wavelength division multiplexing (DWDM).

According to a recent report from Business Communications Company, Inc., the global combined revenue of compound semiconductor-related products, which include materials, components, and subsystems, reached $13 billion in 2004, and is projected to grow at a 17.5% average annual growth rate (AAGR) to nearly $30 billion by 2009. The components market, which includes subcategories of radio-frequency and microwave components, optoelectronic components, and sensor and detector components, accounted for more than $7 billion in 2004 and is expected to grow at an AAGR of 17.9% to $16.8 billion in 2009. Used in electronic devices and fiber optical communications systems, optoelectronic components constitute the majority of the compound semiconductor component market.

SRICO will use the new processing technology it has developed to create efficient optical devices from the visible to the infrared segment of the electromagnetic spectrum, including wavelength frequency converters, laser light sources, modulators, and switches. Such optical components are used by aerospace and defense companies, optical networking companies, and optical switching systems equipment suppliers.

This unique processing technology was developed under contract from the U.S. Air Force through its Small Business Technology Transfer Research (STTR) program. SRICO has partnered with the University of Dayton for this development.

SRICO specializes in the design, development, manufacture, and worldwide marketing of high performance optical integrated circuit components and optoelectronic subsystems that dramatically improve optical signal transmission and electrical measurement in communication and sensor networks. Among the company’s current product portfolio are photonic sensors that detect and measure electric field, current, and voltage; electro-optic modulators; optical wavelength switches; optical frequency converters; and analog fiber optic links.

For more information about this press release please contact:
Sri Sriram, President
614-799-0664
sri@srico.com


SRICO Develops New Materials Platform for Optical Components

Columbus, OH – SRICO, Inc., a manufacturer of optical integrated circuit-based components, has successfully developed a novel ferroelectric relaxor material that will enable the production of a new class of ultra-high sensitivity, compact optical components. The company has successfully demonstrated the use of this new material in a high performance sensor for the U.S. Navy.

Optical integrated circuits are key platforms for components used in fiber optic communication and sensor networks. Using this newly developed materials technology, SRICO will create new optical integrated circuit platforms to be used in sensor, modulator, and switching devices. Optical devices based on ferroelectric relaxor materials are expected to outperform devices based on other materials used as the substrate for currently available commercial components. The new ferroelectric relaxor material is capable of demonstrating an electro-optic coefficient that is more than an order of magnitude higher than the industry standard lithium niobate material. Optical devices fabricated on this ferroelectric relaxor platform have the promise to operate efficiently up to and beyond 100 GHz. Thus, the new materials platform will result in a new generation of optical components for both military and commercial applications in sensing and communication networks.

According to a recent BCC report, the market for non-linear optical materials is expected to reach $1.66 billion by 2009. This growth is mainly due to the demand for telecommunications, lasers and electro-optical applications. Non-linear optical materials are presently used in telecommunications as switches and modulators.

The technology was developed under contract from the U.S. Navy through its Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program. Initial applications of the technology will be the creation of high performance electromagnetic field sensors for high power microwave (HPM) testing. However, the largest market for this technology is for high speed, secure, optical communication devices, such as modulators and switches used in fiber optic and free-space optical communication and switching systems, local area networks (LANs), and chip-to-chip optical interconnects.

SRICO specializes in the design, development, manufacture, and worldwide marketing of high performance optical integrated circuit components and optoelectronic subsystems that dramatically improve optical signal transmission and electrical measurement in communication and sensor networks. Among the company’s current product portfolio are photonic sensors that detect and measure electric field, current, and voltage; electro-optic modulators; optical wavelength switches; optical frequency converters; and analog fiber optic links.

For more information about this press release, please contact:
Sri Sriram, President
614-799-0664
sri@srico.com


SRICO WINS CONTRACT TO DEVELOP ULTRA-HIGH DYNAMIC RANGE OPTICAL MODULATORS

Srico, a Columbus-based photonics company, was awarded a $750,000 Phase II Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract to continue to pursue development for the U.S. Air Force of an ultra-high dynamic range modulated optical source based on a compact Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) intensity modulator. Modulators, which are key components in optical communication and sensor networks, turn light on and off to encode the information being sent through the network.

During the SBIR Phase I preliminary development, Srico set a world-record 66 dB extinction ratio for an optical modulator, a ratio of about 4 million to 1. To achieve these results, the company used proprietary waveguide designs and innovative device fabrication processes. The design ensures that the dynamic range available is more than ten thousand times greater than what is obtainable from currently available commercial Mach-Zehnder modulators. The modulator device is capable of integration onto a larger optical chip containing 256 channels.

The breakthrough technology developed under this SBIR program will be used to develop commercial electro-optic modulator components with very high extinction ratio ≥ 60 dB and low drive voltage that operate over a broad spectral range.

“The ultra-high dynamic range modulators will be a key addition to the company’s modulator product portfolio,” says Sri Sriram, President and Founder of Srico. “This Air Force project is enabling Srico to develop a unique platform technology for surveillance activities in homeland security and defense, phased array and other radar, free space optical communications, satellite communications, mobile communications, sensor networks, and telecommunications networks,” says Sriram.

Srico, which was established in 1990, specializes in integrated optical waveguide components and optoelectronic subsystems that dramatically improve signal transmission and electrical measurement in communication and sensor networks. Among the company’s current product portfolio are electro-optic modulators, optical wavelength switches, analog fiber optic links, and photonic sensors that detect and measure electric field, current, and voltage.


SRICO TO DEVELOP OPTICAL EEG SENSOR SYSTEM TO MONITOR GRAVITY-INDUCED LOSS OF CONSCIOUSNESS (GLOC) IN MILITARY PILOTS

SRICO, Inc., a Columbus-based photonics company, has been awarded a Phase I Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract from the U.S. Navy, Office of Naval Research, to develop a neurophysiological optical sensor suite for Gravity-Induced Loss of Consciousness (GLOC) monitoring and intervention.

Real-time monitoring of the physiological state of pilots flying high performance tactical aircraft would help to prevent aviation mishaps due to gravity-induced loss of consciousness and loss of lives and aircraft. If significant performance and safety improvements are to be achieved in the military, it is important that miniature, compact, reliable, and rugged sensor technologies are developed to monitor the neurophysiological response of the brain in stressful operational environments, including the tactical cockpit. The neurophysiological sensor suite, which uses SRICO’s patented optical PhotrodeTM technology, would offer a new approach for monitoring the physiological conditions of military pilots and other combat personnel in a reliable, convenient, and non-intrusive way. Current electroencephalogram (EEG) monitoring is accomplished through electrode-based instrumentation systems that require adhesives or conductive gel. A PhotrodeTM is a miniature optical chip-based sensor that uses light instead of electricity as the transmission medium, and they do not require adhesives or gels. A set of simple dry-scalp-contact PhotrodesTM, placed in the helmet of an aviator could potentially be used for routinely monitoring EEG in typical military scenarios.

The sensing system would be suitable for integration with tactical aircraft cockpit and control systems to provide a reliable means to rapidly detect the onset of GLOC, provide alert/alarm functions and activate an autopilot recovery mechanism.

Such a product has significant commercial potential outside the military for anesthesia awareness monitoring, critical care monitoring, alertness monitoring in the transportation industry, sleep medicine, and perhaps other neuromonitoring applications.

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